Classical Charlotte Mason Middle & High School Curriculum Choices

It’s time for the 9th Back to Homeschool Blog Hop! Are you ready for the new homeschool year? We are, almost. The mere idea of teaching multiple subjects to four different grades is exhausting. So a few years ago, I opted to combine subjects and curriculum when possible. We adjust the workload and expectations depending on the girl’s ability and interest, and not on their grade level. Right from the start, the girls are involved in the curriculum choice process. This helps take a little of the pressure off me, and helps them become more accountable for their own education. Before overwhelming you with ourREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

We’ve finally come to an end of our Classical Charlotte Mason series, and before we close, I wanted to leave you with a freebie. I created a weekly lesson plan and a 36 week planning printable. The weekly lesson planner I’m sharing is a blank version of the schedule I shared on day 4 of our series (minus the curriculum column). The first column is for the subject, second is for that particular week’s lesson, and you can break down what needs to get done by day on the Monday through Friday columns. We homeschool year round, in 6 week terms, with 1 week inREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

There are many arguments for and against teaching Shakespeare, I chose to share one of each. First up, is an article published in the Washington Post, quoting a high school teacher who does not feel a need to teach it to her students. You can read it here. Next, is an article written by a homeschool mother, who was leery at first, but eventually incorporated teaching the Bard in her home. You can read that article here. I introduced Shakespeare sort of by accident during our first homeschool year, and it’s become our favorite subject since. I sometimes threaten to cancel Shakespeare for a weekREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Music and art are important components of both a Classical and a Charlotte Mason education. In classical education they are a part of embodied learning –  where children learn to cultivate the love for truth, goodness and beauty. In the Charlotte Mason education is the science of relations – so we the child upon physical exercises, nature lore, handicrafts, science and art. With that said, it’s crucial we expose children not only to science, technology and math, but also to the art of beauty. Classical Charlotte Mason Art & Music Resources There’s a great deal of art and music resources on the web. Here’s a list of whatREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Charlotte Mason believed children should spend many hours exploring and learning outdoors. However, this is not very realistic in our time. Specially for those of us who live in the city or in the suburbs. What we have done instead, is allowed ourselves time for a nature outings on Fridays. We’ve had the chance to explore farms, gardens, hiking trails and beaches. We study science more traditionally (books, experiments, directions, etc.) the rest of the week. Here’s a list of our favorite nature study, elementary and upper level science resources. Favorite Nature Study Science Resources Nature Study Books – There’s lots of great books youREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

We’ve developed a great love for history these past four years. History has come alive, and we’ve discovered so much about our ancestors, culture and our country. We spend an average of 3 hours a day on history alone, and it very often feels like just a few minutes. History is no longer a list of dates to be memorized, and dry facts we constantly forget. Our view of history has changed thanks to great curriculum and wonderful books, some of which we hope help you develop a longing to learn more about the past. Favorite Classical Charlotte Mason History Resources History Revealed Diana Waring’sREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Dictionary-dot-com, defines language arts as the skills, including reading, composition, speech, spelling, and dramatics, taught in elementary and secondary schools to give students a thorough proficiency in using the language. In conventional schools, this results in an abnormal detachment of these arts (composition, speech, spelling, grammar, etc.). However both the Classical and Charlotte Mason methods rely heavily on the influence of literature, as a basis for mastering these arts. Most experienced writers will suggest reading more, in order to become a better writer. In the words of Jeff Goins: Nothing inspires a writer like reading someone else’s words. Great Literature and Living Books Great literature evokes emotion, it pulls theREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Welcome to day 4 of our Classical Charlotte Mason homeschooling series. So far we’ve discussed the principles of Classical education, principles of a Charlotte Mason education and some similarities (in my opinion), between the two. Today I’m giving you a peek at what a combination of these philosophies looks like in our homeschool. Classical Charlotte Mason Curriculum and Resources For the last 4 years, we’ve used a combination of Classical and Charlotte Mason curriculum and resources. We’re pretty happy with the results. Some of our favorite free resources are Open Biola, Ambleside Online, YouTube (always exercise caution when on YouTube), No Fear Shakespeare and of course our localREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Welcome to day 3 of our Classical Charlotte Mason series. On days one and two we discussed the principles and benefits of a Classical Education, as well those of a Charlotte Mason education. If you missed either post, please go back and read them here, before we discuss some similarities, and why combining these methods works. I know there are purists on both sides of the spectrum, that would cringe at the thought of combining these philosophies, nevertheless, let’s take a look at how a healthy combination of the two can benefit your homeschool. A quick disclaimer; I’m no expert in either philosophy, but I have successfullyREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Charlotte Mason was a British educator, who believed education is an atmosphere, a discipline, and a life. She believed children are people, with their own thoughts, and ideas, and should be treated as such. She was opposed to treating or talking to children as if they were inferior, unintelligent and ’empty canvases’ ready to be filled with ideas. Instead she encouraged parents to raise children as independent thinkers. Parents and teachers should know how to make sensible use of a child’s circumstances (atmosphere) to forward their sound education; should train them in the discipline of habits of the good life; and should nourish their life with ideas,READ MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

The center of classical education is to love goodness, truth and beauty, and at the very core of a classical education is God. Truth is defined by Him, and knowledge of all things comes from Him. Philippians 4:8 tell us: Finally, brethren, whatever things are true, whatever things are noble, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report, if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy—meditate on these things. In turn, Plato has the following to say about education: The object of education, is to teach us to love what is beautiful. TheREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

What is Classical Charlotte Mason? It’s really is a thing, I promise. There are many debates as to why one method is better than the other, however there are many of us who see a great benefit of combining these two philosophies. Homeschooling allows us to customize the education of each individual child, so don’t be afraid to be creative! Here is what we discussed, during out 10 day series: Principles and Benefits of a Classical Education Principles and Benefits of a Charlotte Mason Education Similarities Between the Classical & Charlotte Mason Methods Our Classical Charlotte Mason Weekly Schedule Favorite Classical Charlotte Mason Language Arts ResourcesREAD MORE

Today I’m participating in the 30 Ways We Homeschool Blog Party at They Call Me Blessed. I’ll be sharing about our Interest-Led Classical Charlotte Mason approach, as well as our daily routine including my work schedule and next years curriculum. Wether you’re a veteran homeschooler or just getting started, this is a great place to gather ideas, gain some wisdom, and get to know 30 very unique families. Before you head over, don’t forget to enter the giveaways.READ MORE