Our Organized Homeschool Space

When I was 2, I was the little girl who organized her stuffed animals by height, color and type on her bed each morning. I was the girl who cried when her younger sister sharpened one of the color pencils a little more than the rest, and the girl who had to get a brand new notebook every time a page had a tiny smudge. Wait a minute, I’m still that girl. I’m obsessive when it comes to organization. In my family it’s called the sickness and it’s taken very seriously. Having an obsessive personality can sometimes be beneficial. This month, I let the OCD tendencies completely take over when reorganizing our homeschool space. Organized Curriculum I’m a proud book and curriculum hoarder, you can see how serious my hoarding case is here, however I finally decided to part with some of our unused curriculum, you can find that post here. Once most of the unused books were gone; we took the rest of our homeschool curriculum, sorted everything by subject, and type. I like these magazine holders from IKEA, because they keep everything neatly in place. I printed colorful labels with a brief description of each holder, so curriculum isREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

We’ve finally come to an end of our Classical Charlotte Mason series, and before we close, I wanted to leave you with a freebie. I created a weekly lesson plan and a 36 week planning printable. The weekly lesson planner I’m sharing is a blank version of the schedule I shared on day 4 of our series (minus the curriculum column). The first column is for the subject, second is for that particular week’s lesson, and you can break down what needs to get done by day on the Monday through Friday columns. We homeschool year round, in 6 week terms, with 1 week in between each term. I typically take that week to evaluate where we are, set a goal for the next term and schedule the next 6 weeks. Once upon a time, I planned every day of every subject. I’ve since learned the art of flexibility and come to realize that planning every second is just not reasonable. I share a bit more on how I plan here. The printable is broken down into 6 week terms for easy week by week planning . Click on the image below, to catch days 1 through 9 of ourREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Welcome to day 4 of our Classical Charlotte Mason homeschooling series. So far we’ve discussed the principles of Classical education, principles of a Charlotte Mason education and some similarities (in my opinion), between the two. Today I’m giving you a peek at what a combination of these philosophies looks like in our homeschool. Classical Charlotte Mason Curriculum and Resources For the last 4 years, we’ve used a combination of Classical and Charlotte Mason curriculum and resources. We’re pretty happy with the results. Some of our favorite free resources are Open Biola, Ambleside Online, YouTube (always exercise caution when on YouTube), No Fear Shakespeare and of course our local library. Some of the curriculum we love, that has worked very well with our Classical Charlotte Mason style includes the History Revealed, Notgrass History, Memoria Press composition, Latin and logic, Apologia science, Life of Fred math, Grammar Galaxy for language Arts, and Classical Conversations flashcards for fact review. Our Classical Charlotte Mason Weekly Schedule This will be our 2nd year of year round homeschooling. We like to take time off every so often, therefore we school in 6 week terms (six weeks on, one week off). I’ve been busy planning our first six week term, thisREAD MORE

Even though we call this thing we do homeschooling, most of us spend a great deal of time learning and teaching outside our homes. In fact one of the greatest advantages of homeschooling is that we are not confined to anyplace in particular. Because of our busy schedules, we often take school ‘to-go’. Here’s a list of the 10 best supplies for homeschooling on the go in our opinion.READ MORE

10 Days of Back to School Planning

Now that we’ve got our curriculum, calendar, and lesson plan in place; it may feel like we’re done, however a crucial part is to plan labs, projects and field trips now. I’m one of those people that really needs to see the big picture to feel  at ease. On day seven of this series we talked about making a side note of anything that might require extra time and planning. Now it’s time to prepare for those days. Last year, my daughter’s best friend joined us for biology labs all year. This sort of co-op approach helped with the cost of lab supplies and kept both girls motivated to get the project done. Based on the original lesson completion plan I scheduled lab days, made a supply list, and a plan to meet her friend at a specific location. One experiment required them to collect samples of pond or lake water, so we met at a local park and had a makeshift lab in the back of our SUV. Keep in mind most curriculum already has a list of the supplies required for each experiment. In our list however I only list things we either need to buy, or make sureREAD MORE

10 Days of Back to School Planning

These past three years, we’ve followed a traditional school calendar. After so many years of public school, we were all used to routinely taking 2 weeks off in the winter and the entire summer off. Also, we have cousins, and lots of public schooled friends that like to plan beach days and sleep overs during the summer. It was just easier that way, or so we thought until it was time to start school in the fall, and it took an entire month for everyone to get back into the homeschool routine, and then interrupted by the two week Thanksgiving break, and as soon as we got back into it again, Christmas break came along, and so on. This year, we’re moving to a year round homeschool calendar, with six weeks on and one week off. Both the girls and I are exited about the week long breaks in between.  So before we start getting our lesson plans in place, let’s figure out when we plan on schooling, when we’re planning on taking vacation, or when we have friends or family come for extended visits. Know your state’s homeschool law. Some states require a certain number of days, and others do not.READ MORE

10 Days of Back to School Planning

Months before we started our first year of homeschooling I was completely overwhelmed by the incredible amount of choices in homeschool curriculum. It wasn’t just that were was tons to choose from, but also that there were so many different styles and philosophies. I was drowning in catalogs, and I doubted if I had heard the call to homeschool at this point. Today we’ll discuss how to choose the right homeschool curriculum for your family.READ MORE

10 Days of Back to School Planning

Reality is, that most homes don’t look Pinterest perfect, and that’s just real life. When you add homeschooling to an already hectic day, our homes often look more like disaster zones. On this 4th day of our summer series, I wanted to share how we manage the homeschool clutter chaos.READ MORE

How We Organized Our Homeschool Space | The Musings of Mum

As we wrap up the school year, and as conventions are around the corner, I’m exited to make room for new curriculum and re-arrange our homeschool space. (This post contains affiliate links. See my full disclosure here.) I’m also very exited about organizing our homeschool space. Yes, organization makes me giddy. For the last few weeks I’ve been cataloguing bookshelves, cleaning out drawers, making lists and getting ready to sell or donate what we don’t plan on using. In our old house, like many homeschool families we used our “formal dining room” as a dedicated schoolroom. Because of the layout, the room was somewhat separate from the main living area, so our house wasn’t cluttered with school related things. Homeschool rooms don’t work for everyone, and they’re really not necessary. However since we had the space, and we had looks of school supplies the room made sense to me. I wanted all the charts and maps and posters on the wall. We actually spent most of our days in that room, crafting, sewing, playing board games. After the move however, though we have more living space, there is no separate schoolroom. The charts, maps and posters are no longer on the walls, and we’ve hadREAD MORE