Our Organized Homeschool Space

When I was 2, I was the little girl who organized her stuffed animals by height, color and type on her bed each morning. I was the girl who cried when her younger sister sharpened one of the color pencils a little more than the rest, and the girl who had to get a brand new notebook every time a page had a tiny smudge. Wait a minute, I’m still that girl. I’m obsessive when it comes to organization. In my family it’s called the sickness and it’s taken very seriously. Having an obsessive personality can sometimes be beneficial. This month, I let the OCDREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

We’ve finally come to an end of our Classical Charlotte Mason series, and before we close, I wanted to leave you with a freebie. I created a weekly lesson plan and a 36 week planning printable. The weekly lesson planner I’m sharing is a blank version of the schedule I shared on day 4 of our series (minus the curriculum column). The first column is for the subject, second is for that particular week’s lesson, and you can break down what needs to get done by day on the Monday through Friday columns. We homeschool year round, in 6 week terms, with 1 week inREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

There are many arguments for and against teaching Shakespeare, I chose to share one of each. First up, is an article published in the Washington Post, quoting a high school teacher who does not feel a need to teach it to her students. You can read it here. Next, is an article written by a homeschool mother, who was leery at first, but eventually incorporated teaching the Bard in her home. You can read that article here. I introduced Shakespeare sort of by accident during our first homeschool year, and it’s become our favorite subject since. I sometimes threaten to cancel Shakespeare for a weekREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Music and art are important components of both a Classical and a Charlotte Mason education. In classical education they are a part of embodied learning –  where children learn to cultivate the love for truth, goodness and beauty. In the Charlotte Mason education is the science of relations – so we the child upon physical exercises, nature lore, handicrafts, science and art. With that said, it’s crucial we expose children not only to science, technology and math, but also to the art of beauty. Classical Charlotte Mason Art & Music Resources There’s a great deal of art and music resources on the web. Here’s a list of whatREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Charlotte Mason believed children should spend many hours exploring and learning outdoors. However, this is not very realistic in our time. Specially for those of us who live in the city or in the suburbs. What we have done instead, is allowed ourselves time for a nature outings on Fridays. We’ve had the chance to explore farms, gardens, hiking trails and beaches. We study science more traditionally (books, experiments, directions, etc.) the rest of the week. Here’s a list of our favorite nature study, elementary and upper level science resources. Favorite Nature Study Science Resources Nature Study Books – There’s lots of great books youREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

We’ve developed a great love for history these past four years. History has come alive, and we’ve discovered so much about our ancestors, culture and our country. We spend an average of 3 hours a day on history alone, and it very often feels like just a few minutes. History is no longer a list of dates to be memorized, and dry facts we constantly forget. Our view of history has changed thanks to great curriculum and wonderful books, some of which we hope help you develop a longing to learn more about the past. Favorite Classical Charlotte Mason History Resources History Revealed Diana Waring’sREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Dictionary-dot-com, defines language arts as the skills, including reading, composition, speech, spelling, and dramatics, taught in elementary and secondary schools to give students a thorough proficiency in using the language. In conventional schools, this results in an abnormal detachment of these arts (composition, speech, spelling, grammar, etc.). However both the Classical and Charlotte Mason methods rely heavily on the influence of literature, as a basis for mastering these arts. Most experienced writers will suggest reading more, in order to become a better writer. In the words of Jeff Goins: Nothing inspires a writer like reading someone else’s words. Great Literature and Living Books Great literature evokes emotion, it pulls theREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Welcome to day 4 of our Classical Charlotte Mason homeschooling series. So far we’ve discussed the principles of Classical education, principles of a Charlotte Mason education and some similarities (in my opinion), between the two. Today I’m giving you a peek at what a combination of these philosophies looks like in our homeschool. Classical Charlotte Mason Curriculum and Resources For the last 4 years, we’ve used a combination of Classical and Charlotte Mason curriculum and resources. We’re pretty happy with the results. Some of our favorite free resources are Open Biola, Ambleside Online, YouTube (always exercise caution when on YouTube), No Fear Shakespeare and of course our localREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Welcome to day 3 of our Classical Charlotte Mason series. On days one and two we discussed the principles and benefits of a Classical Education, as well those of a Charlotte Mason education. If you missed either post, please go back and read them here, before we discuss some similarities, and why combining these methods works. I know there are purists on both sides of the spectrum, that would cringe at the thought of combining these philosophies, nevertheless, let’s take a look at how a healthy combination of the two can benefit your homeschool. A quick disclaimer; I’m no expert in either philosophy, but I have successfullyREAD MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

Charlotte Mason was a British educator, who believed education is an atmosphere, a discipline, and a life. She believed children are people, with their own thoughts, and ideas, and should be treated as such. She was opposed to treating or talking to children as if they were inferior, unintelligent and ’empty canvases’ ready to be filled with ideas. Instead she encouraged parents to raise children as independent thinkers. Parents and teachers should know how to make sensible use of a child’s circumstances (atmosphere) to forward their sound education; should train them in the discipline of habits of the good life; and should nourish their life with ideas,READ MORE

Classical Charlotte Mason

The center of classical education is to love goodness, truth and beauty, and at the very core of a classical education is God. Truth is defined by Him, and knowledge of all things comes from Him. Philippians 4:8 tell us: Finally, brethren, whatever things are true, whatever things are noble, whatever things are just, whatever things are pure, whatever things are lovely, whatever things are of good report, if there is any virtue and if there is anything praiseworthy—meditate on these things. In turn, Plato has the following to say about education: The object of education, is to teach us to love what is beautiful. TheREAD MORE

Relax You CAN Homeschool High School

When I started homeschooling high school a few years ago, all I could think of, was the millions of things that could go wrong, as a result of me not choosing the right curriculum, not assigning the right credit, or not meeting college requirements. Homeschooling High School was seriously scary as a rookie homeschooler, and it can intimidate even some veterans. Though homeschooling my then high school sophomore and junior was not the original plan; I had no other choice. The charter school system was failing them, and neither was on track to graduating high school on time. If homeschooling high school is in your near future,READ MORE

How I Teach Apologetics In Our Homeschool

It’s no secret apologetics are a crucial part of our homeschool. I’ve shared on previous occasions the reasons why having a biblical foundation is critical to prevent losing our kids to the world. Teaching Apologetics Is A Priority in Our Homeschool I picked up Already Gone by Ken Ham & Britt Beemer after a conference a few years ago. In this book, Ken and Britt uncover the reasons why young people are loosing their faith, even while attending Sunday school. I’ve read it a few times over the years and the statistics are eye-opening. In the last three years, I’ve seen a rapid increase in the number of kids we onceREAD MORE

Homeschooling From A Biblical Worldview

I often get asked why we chose homeschooling from a biblical worldview, and though the reasons were many, one of them always stands out. Whatever You Do A few years ago; when all six of our kids attended public school; one of my girls had an exceptional love for God, and a desire to make Him known. Her teacher had declared the first 20 minutes back from recess as quiet reading time and each child chose anything they wanted. Comic books, magazines, picture books, etc. She chose her Bible. Her teacher never discouraged her, and many of the other kids were curious. One day she brought anREAD MORE

This week I had the opportunity to preview the “Is Genesis History?” documentary. Is Genesis History? is a compelling documentary that makes a case for the reliability of scripture. If you’ve been following me for any length of time, you know I’m a huge advocate of teaching children apologetics and defending a Biblical worldview. (I received a digital copy of this film for review purposes, all opinions are my own.) More importantly my goal is to encourage you to teach your children to take the Bible literally. Every. Single. Word. The Bible tells us that: All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable forREAD MORE

Salt Water Conductivity Experiment

This week I’m joining the month-long Science Celebration at The Learning Hypothesis. Enjoy four weeks of science ideas, experiments, activities and a giveaway! My high school science class memories have absolutely nothing to do with science. Both my biology and chemistry teachers were known for incessant lectures and assigning endless research. Therefore I often caught up on sleep (yes, I know that’s bad) and occasionally caught up on homework during this time. I’m a visual and kinesthetic learner, doing, is crucial when I’m learning something new. I’m sad to say that since we hardly ever did any hands on learning, science class was the last placeREAD MORE

Count Your Blessings Gift Basket Giveaway

My husband and kids often ask what I’d like for Mother’s Day, and my response tends to be “a clean house and no sibling arguments”. If you’re a mother, and you’ve got more than 1 child at home, you know that the likelihood of a whole day free of sibling squabbles is as rare as a unicorn or a mermaid sighting. While you wait for that miraculous day to come, why not count your blessings while you drink a cup of coffee? It’s so easy to get beat-up and dragged down by the millions of responsibilities we have every day. Sometimes the difficulties shroud ourREAD MORE

Homeschool-Mom-Guilt-BINGO

We’ve all had those days. You know, the days when you know exactly which assignments you want the kids to complete before taking a week off, or before a holiday, yet nothing gets done. My 3rd oldest is turning 16, or actually she turned 16 last month but we are having a rather large party to celebrate this milestone in the middle of May, and unlike my oldest girl, this one is a little behind on the party planning. A couple of weeks ago we were scheduled to take a quick 5 minute walk-through the banquet hall where said shindig will take place. It’s notREAD MORE

Famous Birthdays

April 28th, marks the 259th birthday celebration of the 5th President of the United States, James Monroe. A Brief Biography James Monroe was born on April 28, 1758, in Westmoreland County, Virginia. After his father’s death, at the age of 16 he enrolled at the College of William and Mary to study law, however, his studies were cut short when he enrolled in the Continental Army. After the war, he studies law under Thomas Jefferson and eventually served in the Continental Congress in 1783. He was elected as the 5th U.S. President in 1817 and served for two terms until 1825.   Check out theseREAD MORE

Famous Birthdays

April 13th marks the 274th birthday celebration of the 3rd President of the United States, Thomas Jefferson. A Brief Biography Thomas Jefferson was born on April 13th, 1743 in Shadwell, in the Colony of Virginia. At the age of 16, he attended the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, where he studies math, metaphysics, and philosophy. While working as a clerk in a law office, he studied law. He ran for office and became the 3rd U.S. President in 1801. Check out these 10 Facts About Thomas Jefferson. 5 of Thomas Jefferson’s Greatest Accomplishments Wrote the Declaration of Independence Drafted the Virginia StatuteREAD MORE